Digital Marketing

Many of you know I had been working on a project here at SNHU going back to 2017. Now that we have a few terms under our belt and data on the success of implementation.. its time to celebrate the MS in Marketing with Digital Marketing Concentration!

Our Marketing Programs here at Southern New Hampshire University, offer so much! I am so proud of the work we have done and feel we are providing our students with experiences that add to their employability as well so many unique opportunities to showcase their learning’s.

Our Masters in Marketing  program is designed with a very strategic approach.

Firstly, We have connected our program to industry

We stay current within industry and business environments; and our courses evolve with the needs of business. We have aligned our programs and courses with skills employers want. We utilize an advisory board of high level individuals in the field to ensure we are addressing current skills gaps in the industry. This Advisory board helps drive discussions around content learners should understand for success in the workplace

2nd We have embraced the importance of Industry Certifications

We have identified opportunities for students to add to their resume through external certifications. We know these industry certifications provide students and their employers with added value.  Within many courses, students will see Certifications and credentials –  and the associations who promote them such as the American Marketing Association, Google, Hubspot, and Hootsuite for example..

3rd Coursework is aligned with deliverables students will encounter in the workplace.

Projects and assignments within the program, are designed to help students make connections between course content and their world. Project-based learning is evident throughout the program, activities are hands on, and meet employer demands. And importantly, Content in the courses is relevant to both students employability and their advancement in the field.

4th Our faculty have extensive real world experience. They are in the field, and can bring those experiences to students in class. These experiences play a huge role in learning and application of concepts.

Visit our program pages here:

Associates Degree- Marketing https://www.snhu.edu/online-degrees/associate/as-in-marketing

Bachelor’s Degree- Marketing https://www.snhu.edu/online-degrees/bachelors/bs-in-marketing

Master Degree – Marketing https://www.snhu.edu/online-degrees/masters/ms-in-marketing

 

In the master’s in marketing online program, students learn how to:

  • Analyze and interpret qualitative and quantitative data to align marketing plans to an organization’s strategic goals
  • Create integrated strategies for maximizing opportunities through the use of marketing theory and practices
  • Distill information through diverse media to inform, negotiate and persuade stakeholders
  • Develop international marketing strategies that address the commercial, political, legal and cultural environments in a global economy
  • Certify marketing practices comply with legal environments, regulatory standards and ethical practices
  • Manage a brand in cross-functional environments to ensure the creation, capture and delivery of value

Marketing is Important.  It transcends all  borders of an organization.

 

Listen to this Hubspot Podcast, where I detail the above points.

To read it: https://academy.hubspot.com/education-partner-program/professors/jessica-rogers

 

GEN X, Overlooked again

The “Slacker” generation is all gown up, and is a marketers dream.. yet why are they overlooked with the focus going to Millennials?

Generation X has been relatively ignored by marketers, despite their influence and spending power. Baby Boomers and Millennials alike have been a source of media fascination and marketer focus, while Generation X sits on the sideline.

Coming of age within distinct time periods shaped members of different generations in ways that influence values and preferences. Because of these generational differences, marketing strategists would be wise to consult research on generational differences when tailoring strategies to specific age cohorts. Marketing strategists target younger consumers because of their comparative openness and malleability in comparison with older consumers. Yet, what about the values and preferences of Generation X in contrast with other generations, as well as the  brand loyalty of Millennials and Generation X (having some similarities)?

https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2019/01/17/where-millennials-end-and-generation-z-begins/

The Myth

Generation X is overlooked in part because of its size, with Generation X (65 million) being smaller than the Boomers (77 million) and the Millennials. Interestingly, the year span for Generation X is less than the typical 20-year span that makes up the other generations, which speaks to its smaller size.

Marketers also have ignored this generation, in part due to its “slacker” reputation that has been perpetuated by cultural references and even within academic research. Other myths about Generation X are that these individuals are cynical, resentful, rebellious, and will buy anything; such myths possibly underlie a lack of research-based marketing attention to this segment. Very few researchers have examined marketing strategy in relation to Generation X, and there are none, to my knowledge, any examining Generation X females in relation to social media use, marketing strategy, or brand relationships other than my own.

Generation X and social media

Researchers have suggested that wise marketing strategists will value research findings over myths and stereotypes about Generation X when developing strategy to attract and retain consumers from this generation. Understanding the values and priorities of a demographic such as Generation X ( females in particular) is essential to segmentation processes, or group-specific marketing strategies . Marketing executives who participated in interviews expressed that segmentation in online marketing was a vital part of any firm’s marketing strategy, and that social media platforms represented an important vehicle for interacting with and learning about different demographic groups.

It is therefore important for researchers to explore social media use among Generation X individuals to enhance marketing effectiveness to this generation.

Social media are an integral part of many GenXers’ day. Neilsen suggests that GenX, not Millenials, are heavy users of social media. Their most recent report showed Generation X spending approximately 7 hours per week on social platforms, with females taking the lead by spending 25% of their time on social media. Marketing to youth, women, and digital natives is a lucrative strategy, given that these major segments have been researched and proven to be highly probable for gaining brand advocacy and because they are the most influential segments in the digital era. It is also worth noting that females tend to be the gatekeepers as to what products and services make their way into the home. This is because of the comprehensive process women typically use to research purchasing decisions, social media included.

The Gap

Marketers have largely ignored Generation X, despite their influence and spending power. This spending power translates into a higher ability to purchase products and services, making this target demographic a valuable audience for marketers. Further, the female demographic within Gen X is a viable focus for academic research, given that they are the main purchase decision-makers for households, regardless of whether they are the end user. It stands to reason, then, that brands need to understand how to effectively create and curate social media content to best serve this segment of the population that is both under-served and has enormous potential.. ..latchkey or not.

 

Research thoughts

In an era of post-truth, where opinions are misconstrued as facts, it is vital for both consumers and brand leaders to be more responsible in generating branded content so as to be more truthful and honest. Social media content allows brands to tell a brand story. Also contributing to this brand story is content created and shared by consumers (Rogers, 2015). It then becomes imperative for both users and brand leaders to create a brand story that would be close to the truth, while at the same time, nourishing the established relationships between brand and customer commitment to the brand.

Results of my recent research provides a preliminary model for the processes of social exchange theory in the context of social media use. Spending power of the consumers has the potential to either make or break a brand. It is ostensible that researchers may undertake further studies in order to achieve extensive knowledge on how the interplay of user engagement and brandloyalty is mediated by perceived costs and benefits, as well as other factors that impact brand content and online consumerism.

SNHU Marketing


It took me six years, 22 weeks and two days to finish my PhD!  Southern New Hampshire University recently posted an article on my journey as well as my thoughts on our new  Digital Marketing concentration.  I am very excited our students will be benefiting from  HubSpot’s Educational Partner Program in courses that are not only user-friendly, but also aligned what employers want , and  include  industry certification prep.

Read the article here:  Spotlight on SNHU Marketing Faculty Lead Dr. J | SNHU